Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering in the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan

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NASA Media Teleconference: MESSENGER Reveals New Details of Planet Mercury

Posted: September 28, 2011

NASA Media Teleconference: MESSENGER Reveals New Details of Planet Mercury

AOSS professor Thomas Zurbuchen will participate in tomorrow's media teleconference: NASA'S MESSENGER Reveals New Details of Planet Mercury.

NASA will host a media teleconference at 2 p.m. EDT on Thursday, Sept. 29, to discuss new data and images from the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury. The new findings are reported in a series of seven papers published in a special section of Science magazine on Sept. 30.

NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft conducted fifteen laps through the inner solar system for more than six years before achieving the historic orbit insertion on March 18.
 
Briefing participants are:
-     Ed Graykzeck, MESSENGER program manager, NASA Headquarters, Washington
-     James Head, III, professor of geological sciences, Brown University
-     David Blewett, MESSENGER participating scientist and staff scientist, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), Laurel, Md.
-     Patrick Peplowski, staff scientist, APL
-     Thomas Zurbuchen, professor of space science and aerospace engineering, University of Michigan

Further Information

 


 

MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) is a NASA-sponsored scientific investigation of the planet Mercury and the first space mission designed to orbit the planet closest to the Sun. The MESSENGER spacecraft launched on August 3, 2004, and entered orbit about Mercury on March 17, 2011 (March 18, 2011 UTC), to begin a yearlong study of its target planet. Dr. Sean C. Solomon, of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, leads the mission as Principal Investigator. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory built and operates the MESSENGER spacecraft and manages this Discovery-class mission for NASA.

 

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